Summer Reading (Tentative) Plans

It’s so difficult to choose what I want to read over the summer, because I’ve accumulated a fantastic little library of my own this year, thanks to Thriftbooks. To be honest, this semester has been absolutely brutal for me, dealing with loss, difficult people, and other personal issues. I’m looking forward to my summer reading as a sort of therapy for me, which is why I don’t want to plague myself with rules and schedules for now. I can worry about challenging myself at a later time. Furthermore, I want to really feed my writer’s mind with excellent reading. Another focus for my summer is going to be blogging daily in order to grow as a writer. It is my hope to be inspired, to learn, and to grow with amazing authors.

Because of all my different interests – each so important to me – I have divided my summer reading into three categories: Young Adult, Spiritual, and Cowboy.

Young Adult Reading:

First and foremost, I plan to read three amazing gentlemen, whom I am inspired by already, yet I have not read a single novel that they have written. I suppose this reading is somewhat inspired by my spirituality (all three are Catholic apologists), but I look forward to diving into their wonderful fantasy worlds. Additionally, I hope to be inspired by their lives and their writing techniques. Chesterton’s Father Brown mysteries, Tolkien’s The Hobbit, and Lewis’s first book in the series The Chronicles of Narnia will be up first.

Spiritual Reading:

I am very close to finishing a really refreshing book that takes the reader through notable locations of Catholicism/Christianity throughout the world. I feel that I have experienced the Holy Land, Rio, Chesterton’s pub, the Holocaust (where many Catholics were martyred), JPII’s home in Poland, and many more locations without ever leaving my room. I’ll be sad when this book ends, but I have been reading it for a long time. Such is the curse of a reader!

letters

Kathleen Norris is an author I encountered in Dr. Coughlin’s Nonfiction Creative Writing class. I absolutely adored her style of writing and related to her sentiments about Catholicism and living in the West. I currently have two of her books in my possession and intend to soak up each word she has written for my own spiritual journey and to grow as a writer.

Finally, one book that I have found highly recommended online is Cardinal Sarah‘s The Power of Silence: Against the Dictatorship of Noise. To paraphrase a review that I read, “Every paragraph is food for the soul.” I have no idea what to expect with this book, but I believe that it is going to be very enlightening for me!

power

Cowboy Reading:

Now for the fun section. In reading more cowboy literature, I hope to familiarize myself with the wildness, humor, and seriousness involved in writing about my culture. It is my ultimate hope to publish nonfiction writing that illustrates the lifestyle that I am surrounded by, as I feel that it is a way of life that needs to be more represented in literature.

One author that I would like to be more familiar with, due to his fame among cowboys, is the legendary author and illustrator, Will James. His books are pretty easy to move through, so none of them should take me very long to read.

Finally, another great cowboy writer is Ben Green. I have his book, Horse Tradin’ and the sequel, Some More Horse Tradin’, which are true stories from his life making a living buying and selling horses. From these books, I hope to learn about the art of storytelling. Most of his stories are from real life, and many people think their stories are not worth sharing. I hope to fight this notion with my work down the road.

 

Getting Students to Read

This week’s reading included some of the greatest professional reading we’ve had in a while. I’ll share my favorite takeaways from each of the four articles we read.

Aim Higher: A Case for Choice Reading and a Whole Lot More in AP English:

One parent talked to this particular teacher saying, “I wish my daughter was in your AP Lit class. She has to decorate shoe boxes in her class,” to prove that she was “reading.” I’m sure the teacher of this student had a plan that was probably elaborate and meaningful to her. However, when you take a step back, you notice that she may have lost sight of the purpose behind reading.

This was a quote from a student: “I was an AP Lit kid, and an Honors English kid.  I SparkNoted The Scarlet Letter, Beowulf, Iliad, Catcher in the Rye, and the rest.  I never read a bit of it.” This was absolutely my experience as a high school student. That was all English class ever meant to me – SparkNotes and last minute skimming of the text. I was never learning and never reading, only striving for the grade. I could do this by memorizing study guides and gleaning big ‘themes’ from SparkNotes without ever having to do much work.

It was also mentioned that many people’s experiences after high school was to revisit the classics. It turns out that many actually enjoy them when they can choose to be reading them. This was my experience exactly! When I didn’t have to butcher The Great Gatsby for meaning and could just enjoy Fitzgerald’s wonderful language and writing, it was a magical experience for me.

My biggest takeaway from this article was this: You can’t put a price on reading, or it’s immediately devalued.

photo of person reading book on beach
Photo by anouar olh on Pexels.com

CURING THE READING GERM BY JIM BAILEY

“Anyone can fake it on a book report but it’s hard to fake a reading conference,” the article said. Mr. Bailey’s school had caught the Accelerated Reader bug, which was something I also went through in elementary school. It was quite easy to simply take the AR tests without having read the book and teachers were taxed with the responsibility of ensuring that we were being honest about it – an impossible job on top of all their other responsibilities. Reading conferences provide the social aspect to reading and naturally bring about an intrinsic motivation to read and share what you read.

Bailey also said, “I am convinced there is no better way to motivate students to read and write than to have authors visit your school.  We celebrate them like the rock stars they are.” What a great observation! I had never thought of this. It is worth remembering as a future teacher to help administration organize these events.

These were all great ideas!

Restrict screen time: It’s actually the most merciful thing one could do for children. I’ve limited my own screen time since the start of the year and my life has been more rich and enjoyable ever since.

Put books in the bathroom: This was hilarious! As long as they don’t have their phones with them, I could definitely see this working well.

woman wearing green top reading book
Photo by Artem Bali on Pexels.com

6 Simple Ideas to Get Kids to Read

Classroom libraries in every classroom. I have definitely heard the concept of having an English Language Arts classroom that has books spilling over students, but never made the connection that they should be in ALL classrooms. I’m very intrigued. I could see students interested in history class being more inclined to pick up books from the classroom library in a social studies classroom! This could have many positive effects.

Pushing books into hands. I think I am guilty of this already, but could always be more pushy 😉 I have to remember that it’s not a bad thing to be a great example of a reader for my students. Being slightly obsessed is part of this.

Let students shop for books. There is nothing I love more than ordering new books and getting that package in the mail. What a genius idea to have students be a part of this process – especially the hesitant readers!

It’s Monday! What Are YOU Reading?

The final rush before spring break is in full swing for me. I am reeling and stressing for all the homework I need to get done in a short amount of time, so I’m thankful for my coffee pot and oddly enough, the cold weather. When it’s brutally cold like it is, at least I won’t feel as guilty for not spending time outside 🙂

Last week was pretty slow for my Adolescent Lit. reading, as I didn’t finish as many books as I’d hoped. However, the quality of books I read make them worth sharing with all of you!

What the Night Sings, by Vesper Stamper (illustrated novel)

nightFirst, our book club read a phenomenal novel by Vesper Stamper. This up-and-coming author hit it out of the park with this book, in my opinion. She has such an inspirational story of her own, overcoming a paralysis in one of her arms as an artist. Stamper re-learned how to create art and illustrates her own books. Furthermore, the story in this novel is incredible. It’s unique in Holocaust literature, as the timeline begins with the liberation of a death camp, which is much different than most Holocaust stories we are used to reading. It brings many new aspects of the Holocaust to light, such as those who were Jewish by heritage, but not religiously; the role of music as a saving grace; the twisted psychology used by Nazis, the politics existing in Germany after liberation; immigration to other countries after the war; and even harsh physical truths as a result of severe starvation, such as the question of being able to give birth or the loss of one’s voice. The experience of this book is indescribable, and I’d recommend it to anyone.

Peace, Locomotion, by Jacqueline Woodson (verse novel, written in letters; sequel to Locomotion)

peace

I am currently reading Peace, Locomotion, as well. This book will cross off my “verse novel” slot on my bingo sheet. I had a hard time deciding what kind of book this was, as every page is written as a letter, but I decided that classifying it as a verse novel would be acceptable. It’s the “companion” to the book Locomotion, which was a National Book Award finalist and Coretta Scott King Honor book. It’s a very quick read (I should have it done in an hour, once I get to sit down and read for pleasure) and the format is very interesting. Woodson has done some amazing things in the way of Language Arts and creating diverse literature for students to read. The narrator, Lonnie, is relatable and a great writer, even in his letters. This pair of books has great value in our future classrooms, as students can have something to look forward to reading after finishing the first book. Woodson is a must-read author this semester!